What is the purpose of  Vitamins & what else do we need to know?

Natural Vitamins are made by hormones

The human body Vitamin system works mostly by itself but due to modern lifestyles it is important to have a blood test once a year you make sure everything is within the normal range.  Do not under any circumstances just go a buy a bottle of pills just because someone says is good for you. Don’t listen to TV marketing. Trust your body but do yourself a favour do a bit of maintenance for your birthday.

Vitamin A: Retinol

This is used for our eyesight, growth, appetite and taste. If you do not have enough you may suffer from night blindness. This vitamin is fat-soluble and is stored in the body for a long time, especially in pregnancy. An overdose may be dangerous.

Vitamin B1: Thiamine

B1 looks after our nervous system, digestion, muscles, heart, alcohol-damaged nerve tissues. If you do not have enough you may feel tingling in fingers and toes, confusion, difficulties in maintaining balance, loss of appetite, exhaustion and weakened powers of concentration. Too much is no danger because it dissolves in water and any excess is passed in urine.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin):

B2 is about body growth, (skin, nails, hair etc.) & eyesight, the breakdown of protein, fat and carbohydrates. If not enough, eyes and nose, mouth and throat can be affected. The corners of the lips may crack Too much is no danger because it dissolves in water and any excess is passed in urine.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine):

Pyridoxine is in the vitamin B family. It is required by the body to make amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. It also helps the body absorb protein and carbohydrate. prevents skin conditions and nerve problems. To much may cause skin inflammation. It is also used in the treatment of various problems identified by doctors and like many other vitamins may be added to some breakfast cereals.

Vitamin B12:

B12 makes red blood cells and the formation of the nervous system. If there isn’t enough there may be just feeling lazy, or getting tired easily, also tingling of hands, feet. There may be memory problems and anaemia. Too much is no danger because it dissolves in water and any excess is passed in urine. You can lose some by too much water, sunlight and heat

 Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid):

This is one of the vitamins heavily involved in the Immune defence system, protection from viruses and bacteria, healing wounds, reducing cholesterol, cell lifespan and preventing scurvy. In simple terms, scurvy is when the skin breaks down and holes form. Vitamin C stops this. In wounds, it helps bring the edges of the wound together to make sure the skin is made whole again. Not enough causes tiredness, but bleeding gums and wounds that are very slow to heal are a good indication. Large doses can cause diarrhoea and nausea and may damage your DNA. Vitamin C is not naturally made by the body and needs to be ingested by eating fresh fruits and vegetable Note:  boiling (including in can or bottles), or  leaving it in sunlight and heat generally will destroy it. Smoking tobacco is not helpful. If supplements are taken it is useful to take small doses twice daily rather than one large dose.

Vitamin D: (This actually a hormone)

http://iamjane.org/be-safe/part-10-what-are-hormones-and-what-do-they-do/

Vitamin E:

This is a powerful anti-oxidant and fight toxins. Not enough may cause weak muscles and fertility problems. It reacts with warfarin and is dangerous because it increases to risk of bleeding. It can be lost when subjected to heat, oxygen, frost, iron and chlorine

Where can we get natural vitamins?

Biotin:

Biotin deficiency is rare. The amounts needed are small, a wide range of foods contain biotin. It is also known as Vitamin B7; Vitamin H; Coenzyme R; Biopeiderm. For more details see. https://en.wikipedia.org

Folic Acid:

Helps with making red blood cells. (very essential in the first 3-months of pregnancy) Too much is no danger because it dissolves in water and any excess is passed in urine. You can lose some by too much water, sunlight, alcohol, oestrogen and sleeping medication

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply