why does some good foods cause serious problems for our body and mind?

Yes! Some good foods cause serious problems and if we do not eat some foods that also can cause problems, This post is not going to provide nutritional advice or medical advice because everyone is different and some countries have different foods. We are just giving you the basic information

We will list some foods and point out conflicts to assist you to understand lists do not suit everyone.  Keeping fit with exercise and healthy lifestyles is important, however, we must eat good basic food and fluids that are important to a healthy body. Our body depends on us and it is essential that we do not get it wrong

LET'S LOOK  AT FOOD

MACRO-NUTRIENTS: There are three macro-nutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fats. Macro-nutrients are essential for proper body functioning, and the body requires large amounts of them. But they cannot be made by our body and must be obtained through diet. Some of these foods cause serious problems.

  • Carbohydrates
    • Carbohydrates contain carbon, hydrogen and oxygen and they are the body's main source of energy’
    • Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibres found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products. Some diets try to avoid them but they are essential
  • Fats
    • There are four types of fats: saturated, monounsaturated, trans and polyunsaturated.
    • Good: unsaturated fats
      • Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — lower disease risk. Foods high in good fats include vegetable oils (such as olive, canola, sunflower, soy, and corn), nuts, seeds, and fish. salmon, avocados, olives, and walnuts.
    • Bad: Saturated fats.
      • Foods containing large amounts of saturated fat include red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream. Some plant-based fats like coconut oil and palm oil are also rich in saturated fat.
      • Saturated fats, while not as harmful as trans fats, by comparison with unsaturated fats negatively impact health and are best consumed in moderation
    • Very Bad: Trans fats.
      • These increase disease risk, even when eaten in small quantities. Foods containing trans fats are primarily in processed foods made with trans fats from partially hydrogenated oil. Fortunately, trans fats have been eliminated from many of these foods.
    • Dietary fat
      • When it comes to dietary fat, what matters most is the type of fat you eat.
      • Everyone was told to cut our fat but newer research shows that healthy fats are necessary and beneficial for health
      • When food manufacturers reduce fat, they often replace it with carbohydrates from sugar, refined grains, or other starches.
        • Our bodies digest these refined carbohydrates and starches very quickly, affecting blood sugar and insulin levels and possibly resulting in weight gain and disease.

TWO MAIN FOOD PROBLEMS: 

  • Food Intolerance
    • Food intolerance has many different causes, with the key difference being that they DO NOT involve activation of the body’s immune system.
    • The symptoms of food intolerance predominately affect one system (our digestive system). Gut symptoms due to food intolerance typically result due to components within a food not being digested and/or absorbed well. This in turn can result in higher levels of gas production by bacteria that live in the large intestine or cause excess water to be drawn into the bowel, leading to symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain and changes in bowel habit (i.e. diarrhea or constipation).
    • The skin can be affected by certain chemicals found naturally in or added to food, for example the natural chemical group, salicylates can trigger hives and/or asthma in sensitive people.
    • Despite the symptoms of food intolerance being unpleasant, they are not life threatening.
    • Onset of symptoms is also usually quite delayed (several hours to several days) and may not occur every time the offending food is consumed.
    • The symptoms of food intolerance are therefore ‘dose responsive’, meaning that symptoms will not be experienced until a certain amount or ‘threshold dose’ of the food has been eaten.
      • This ‘threshold dose’ can vary significantly between individuals. First onset of a food intolerance can occur at any age, but unlike food allergies, food intolerance cannot be diagnosed using any specific test.
  • Food Allergy
    • A food allergy results when the body’s immune system has an abnormal reaction after exposure to a particular food protein. Exposure may be via eating the food.
    • However, in severe cases it may also be triggered by simply touching the food.
    • In allergic individuals, the body’s immune system responds by releasing various chemicals into the blood stream, which can affect many different parts of the body.
    • These chemicals are responsible for the often-severe symptoms associated with a food allergy including an itchy skin rash (hives), swelling of the lips, mouth and tongue, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal cramping and even breathing difficulties.
    • Extremely severe allergic reactions to food, known as anaphylaxis, can even be life threatening and require urgent medical attention.  Onset of symptoms in someone with a food allergy can be extremely rapid (within minutes), however, delayed reactions are also known to occur (taking several hours). Exposure to even trace amounts of the responsible food protein is often enough to trigger activation of the immune system and result in symptoms.
    • For this reason, strict avoidance of the food protein is necessary and being able to confidently read and understand food labels is key to avoiding unintentional exposure.
    • Food allergies are typically first recognised and diagnosed in infancy or early childhood and new diagnosis as an adult is rare.
    • These foods cause serious problems
      • It is important that they diagnosed by an allergist, who uses a detailed medical and symptom history in combination with skin prick testing.

WHAT ABOUT FOOD CAUSING INFLAMMATION?

  • What is inflammation?
    • Inflammation is not usually a bad thing — it is just the body trying to protect itself from further injury or illness by increasing the immune response in the area being threatened by bacteria or injury.
      • Associated pain draws you attention to a possible problem,
    • Inflammation is the body's response to illnesses including infections or injuries. The body's immune system sends an increased amount of white blood cells to the area fighting off the infection or injury.
    • However, there are several chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis, psoriasis, and asthma that can cause the immune system to go into overdrive and attack healthy tissues.
      • In addition to taking any prescribed medications, a person with an inflammatory disease can try to reduce inflammation by making changes to their diet.
      • Conditions such as asthma, diabetes, arthritis, and psoriasis may be managed with an anti-inflammatory diet.
  • Foods to eat for an anti-inflammatory diet
    • dark leafy greens, including kale and spinach
    • blueberries, blackberries, and cherries
    • dark red grapes
    • nutrition-dense vegetables, such as broccoli and cauliflower
    • beans and lentils
    • green tea
    • red wine, in moderation
    • avocado and coconut
    • olives, extra virgin olive oil
    • walnuts, pistachios, pine nuts, and almonds
    • cold water fish, including salmon and sardines
    • turmeric and cinnamon
    • dark chocolate
    • spices and herbs
  • Foods to avoid
    • processed meats
    • sugary drinks
    • trans fats, found in fried foods
    • white bread
    • white pasta
    • gluten
    • soybean oil and vegetable oil
    • processed snack foods, such as chips and crackers
    • desserts, such as cookies, candy, and ice cream
    • excess alcohol
    • too many carbohydrates
    • Some people find that tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and potatoes, can trigger flares in some inflammatory diseases.
  • Conflicts
    • Obviously, if a person has food allergy or intolerance those foods must be excluded.
    • There is some evidence that suggests a high-carbohydrate diet, even when the carbs are healthful, may promote inflammation. Because of this, many people on an anti-inflammatory diet choose to reduce their carbohydrate intake.
    • People considering an anti-inflammatory diet may also want to consider eliminating meat in favour of vegetarian protein sources or fatty fish.
      • Note:
      • Research suggests that people following a vegetarian diet have higher levels of plasma AA, that indicates overall health that is associated with lower levels of inflammation and heart disease.
      • A 2017 study found that eating animal products increased the risk of systemic inflammation, while another study suggests that reduced inflammation is one of the key benefits of a vegan diet.

Anti-inflammatory diets may be a big adjustment for people who tend to eat different kinds of food.

  • There are several things a person can do to make the transition to an anti-inflammatory diet easier, including:
    • eating a variety of fruits and vegetables
    • reducing the amount of fast food eaten
    • eliminating soda and sugary beverages
    • planning shopping lists to ensure healthful meals and snacks are on hand
    • carrying small anti-inflammatory snacks while on the go
    • drinking more water
    • staying within the daily calorie requirements
    • adding supplements, such as omega-3 and turmeric, to the diet
    • exercising regularly
    • getting the proper amount of sleep

Let’s focus on our muscles and joint inflammation pain

  • REDUCE SUGARS
    • One thing that has been proven to have a detrimental impact on the overall health of our muscles and joints is an over consumption of sugar.
      • Especially reduce high fructose corn syrup which is a highly concentrated sugar.
      • Read labels for hidden sugars.
    • Taking a maximum of 25 grams per day will provide health benefits. (one teaspoon is 4 grams)
      • This is very hard. Even a small can of coke has about 10 teaspoons of sugar)
  • EAT MORE FISH
    • Eat more fish such as mackerel, salmon, tuna, and sardines. These fish contain potent omega-3 fatty acids that help to reduce inflammation.
  • EAT GOOD FATS (See above)
    • Healthy fats have anti-inflammatory properties
      • Olives & olive oil
      • Coconuts & coconut oil
      • Avocados
      • Organic pastured egg yolks
      • Raw nuts like pecans and almonds
      • Butter made from raw grass-fed organic milk
  • EAT FOODS RICH IN MAGNESIUM, POTASSIUM, AND CALCIUM
    • Magnesium rich foods: almonds, cashews, pumpkin seeds, green leafy vegetables, and beans
    • Calcium rich foods: collard greens, kale, sardines with bones, yogurt, and ricotta cheese
    • Potassium rich foods: sweet potatoes, white beans, spinach, and dried apricots
  • EAT FOODS RICH IN ANTIOXIDANTS
    • Fruits with the highest antioxidant content include blueberries, black currants, wild strawberries, cranberries, acai & goji berries s
    • Vegetables with the highest antioxidant content include artichokes, spinach, kale, red & green chili peppers, red cabbage, and red beets
    • Nuts with the highest antioxidant content include pecans, walnuts, and almonds
  • ADDITIONAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY FOODS TO COMPLETE YOUR DIET
    • Garlic has been shown to work similarly to pain medications (like Ibuprofen) by shutting off the pathways that lead to inflammation
    • Onions contain a compound called quercetin which helps stabilize the cells that release histamine, creating an anti-inflammatory effect
    • Berries contain anthocyanins which have anti-inflammatory property
    • Red raspberry extract helped to prevent animals from developing arthritis
    • Blueberry help protect against intestinal inflammation and ulcerative colitis

Foods cause serious problems but not getting enough calcium can cause bone problems.  Please look at our health matters index which will lead you to some amazing information

FEED YOUR BONES BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE YOUR PERSONAL HEALTH MATTERS INDEX PAGE

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